A short video series: using neuroscience to drive performance & engagement

A short video series: using neuroscience to drive performance & engagement

Two weeks ago, I launched a video series on this blog focused on helping you leverage neuroscience to drive employee engagement and performance. But I quickly realized that breaking it into several, individual posts made the content and learning feel disjointed; so today we are integrating the series into one post.

The videos below are arranged in sequential order, beginning with video 1: “The human brain at work.” Use the arrows to navigate.

Throughout the series, I encourage you to anchor your learning to this bottom line: creating a healthy work environment is not just ‘the right thing to do’ or ‘a nice-to-have’—rather, it critical to business success. Your team can only access their brightest ideas and deliver their best work when operating in a healthy climate. It is up to the leader and every team member to create this type of environment. Watch the videos to learn how.

 

Interested in exploring more ways to grow in your leadership? Join my five-day challenge designed specifically for people managers. You’ll be guided through five actionable exercises that will give your leadership (and team) a boost. These daily challenges will be delivered directly to your inbox—one per day, starting April 5th. You’ll learn best practices, implement them real-time, and drive meaningful results. Take the challenge!

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Am I valued here? (S in SCARF model)

Am I valued here? (S in SCARF model)

We’re continuing our deep dive into how the human brain perceives and reacts to the workplace, and how you can use this awareness to create an environment that maximizes performance and engagement.

Let’s be clear: this is not soft, fluffy stuff. This is science, and it has a direct impact on your team’s ability to perform and, therefore, on your bottom line.

Before watching today’s video on the “S” in Dr. David Rock’s SCARF model, which stands for status, be sure to watch last week’s two, short introductory videos. Viewing these first is essential. 

Okay, promise you watched the introductory videos? If so, you’re ready to dive into this one. As you watch it, consider the following: How valued do my employees feel? Do they have a strong sense of purpose and impact in their work? Do they feel appreciated and important? What will I do to enhance their sense of status? 

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The human brain at work

The human brain at work

I’m very passionate about today’s topic. Lately, I have witnessed leaders neglecting it on numerous occasions. The negative impact of their neglect is significant—involving both human and business costs. Though my natural instincts ignite a protective ‘mama bear’ reaction, I know the best antidote to neglect is growing awareness. So, here I am today, inviting you to lean into learning with me on this topic. 

What is this topic, you ask? Well, it’s the most important job of a leader: creating a healthy work environment that brings out the best in your team. I know it sounds cliché, but I promise it’s so much more than that. To truly understand it, we need to follow the science and explore how the human brain perceives and responds to workplace dynamics.

I recommend watching both videos in sequential order.

I can’t leave you hanging there, so here’s a quick introduction to the SCARF Model (developed by Dr. David Rock, NeuroLeadership Institute). Please stay tuned as we dive into each SCARF element over the next five weeks. I want to ensure these stick so that you are equipped and ready to apply them at work and beyond.

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Connection over perfection

Connection over perfection

We place a lot of pressure on ourselves to perform perfectly, know all the answers, and maintain a polished reputation. That’s pretty stressful considering perfection is humanly impossible.

What if, instead of aiming for perfection, we aimed for connection? And what if, instead of ensuring we look good and feel valued, we focused on making others look good and feel valued?

In this week’s Two-Minute Tip, I share a personal story of a time when I attempted these exact mindset shifts in the face of high client expectations that I wasn’t sure I could meet. I’m happy to report that they actually work…and, in this scenario, resulted in a satisfied client.

P.S. Shout out to my wise friend and colleague, Nancy Buffington, who taught me this powerful mantra: aim for connection, not perfection.

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The power of a circle

The power of a circle

When you find yourself wanting team dynamics to change, or wanting a specific relationship to improve, what do you do? Probably a lot of things. I’m guessing you work hard to brainstorm and apply many different approaches to drive growth.

But have you tried the circle trick? We tend to forget this strategy—or ignore it—for many reasons. Though somewhat painful to implement, it’s typically the most effective. And I promise, it will become more encouraging than painful after some practice.

Healthy relationships are the backbone and lifeblood of a strong organization. Let’s do everything in our power to foster them. 

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What gets recognized gets repeated

What gets recognized gets repeated

Though free and immensely impactful, giving thoughtful praise is one of the most untapped management resources out there. Let’s change that. Giving meaningful positive feedback boosts employee engagement and performance—what gets recognized, gets repeated.

On high-performing teams, the ratio of positive to negative feedback is 5:1. What does your feedback ratio look like? In this video, I share examples of how to give specific (vs. generic) praise.

I admit that this video is a bit longer than most, but if you stick with me after the two-minute mark, you’ll get an entertaining glimpse into my marriage that further illustrates this important practice.

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